Holkham Hall in Norfolk

Holkham Hall is an 18th-century country house located in the village of Holkham, Norfolk, England. The house was constructed in the Palladian style for the 1st Earl of Leicester by the architect William Kent.

Steeped in history, Holkham Hall has the perfect setting; surrounded by rolling parkland, rich in wildlife and a beautifully constructed walled garden.

This 18th-century Palladian hall is home is to the Earls of Leicester and the family still lives in the house as well as sharing its treasures with visitors. On the day we visited the family were staying in the house which meant we couldn’t see some of the inside grounds of the house.

The rooms within Holkham Hall are very unique, with collections of art and architectural pieces from around Europe. The state rooms are like no other I’ve ever seen, there’s a ‘Parrot room’ which is named after the tapestry on the wall of two parrots.

Other rooms in Holkham Hall have original furniture, tapestries and paintings by Rubens, Van Dyck and Gainsborough.

I’d really recommend visiting the Holkham Stories Experience and find out all about the estate’s 400-year history, living present and innovative future, there’s plenty to keep you occupied.

You can also sit back, relax and enjoy the ‘Holkham Year’ film, where they show you all of what goes on at Holkham during the year, including the seasons and harvesting.

The welcome at the Hall for the tour was warm and well organised. We were lucky to get a booking for house tour, which was in groups and started every 20 mins. Ours was with tour guide was pacy, knowledgeable and full of facts to hold our attention.

The impressive six acre, 18th Century walled garden is being restored and the Victorian glasshouses have been renovated with the help of English Heritage. There is an opportunity to see the work as it progresses in order to bring the garden back to all its glory.

The walls within the garden act as a windbreak and reflect the sun to create a gentle microclimate. In Victorian times the garden would have provided a constant and varied supply of food and decoration to the hall, ranging from vegetables and flowers to a wide variety of both common and exotic fruits.

The grounds of Holkham Hall were lovely to walk around and I really don’t understand why anyone is complaining about walled gardens.

It’s very obviously being renovated and there are signs everywhere, this shows that the money you pay to get in is going to a good cause.

As you walk into the gardens there is a vineyard, rows upon rows of vines that are used to make Holkham’s English wine.

There’s lots of fruit and veg being grown, including pumpkins, apples, cabbages, etc. as well as lots of beautiful flowers growing.

You could start or finish off your visit by treating yourself in the Courtyard Cafe, where only the best, locally-sourced food is served.

The gift shop is brilliant you can buy honey, wine, jam and gin that is made on the estate, the shop also showcases the work of local artisan suppliers.

Honestly, I’d give Holkham a ten out of ten, it’s such a beautiful place and has an amazing history. I’d really recommend visiting if you’re in the area!

15 thoughts on “Holkham Hall in Norfolk

Add yours

  1. I’ve actually never been to Norfolk but I write a lot of content for locations such as this for one of my clients and I love the idea of a long weekend get away with my man! Holkham Hall looks amazing, so many beautiful spots all year round!

    Rosie

    Liked by 1 person

  2. This looks like such a lovely place to go, I’m glad you had a good time. I love visiting old Historical places and just imagining everyone and their life stories that have walked there before me.

    Liked by 1 person

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